tips and tricks as well as jigs for the wood shop (woodworking tips)

by Robert
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woodworking tips and jigs for the wood shop how to save time if you are going to make a lot of the same thing. what i did was go and draw the pattern on my bench for the ends of the bench that i planed on making several of. also i made some jigs for cutting the seat slats on the table saw. this way it was fast to set up if i moved the fence for another project that i might be working on. i hope this helps you and you like it. please feel free to comment, like and share. also don’t forget to subscribe for new videos every week thanks and enjoy.

Professional woodworker, John Landis, takes you on as his apprentice through a series of educational woodworking videos. Using projects being built in his company’s shop, he’ll go over techniques and procedures that easily apply to projects you may be working on. He’ll use tools such as the jointer, planer, lathe, table saw, router, band saw and hand tools.

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  • Dana M
    June 28, 2016

    Thanks.  Every little bit helps…

  • Aaron Anderson
    June 28, 2016

    i love your videos and i cant wait to watch the rest and learn so much however i would like to make a suggestion that may have already been commented on so forgive me if it has.

    if your planning on making alot of videos, I would suggest getting a good quality mic. every video your voice is diffrent and hard to hear because of your distance from the camera. thanks!

  • rando commando
    June 28, 2016

    great video, direct and clearly demonstrated

  • Alpha Brown
    June 28, 2016

    You're awesome. I'm relatively new to this craft (2 years or so) and I've learned everything through YouTube and trial and error. In all of this time I've yet to hear anyone explain the milling process in such a manner. I love How you emphasize the fact that it doesn't matter how you get it done, but that you get it done. I'm a divorced father of 4 with limited means, and I build out of my garage. The principles you've outlined within these video's are terrific and are resources I now refer to on a regular basis.

    Thanks for putting this information out there. I really appreciate it.

    You're newest apprentice (and biggest fan)

    Alpha

  • Zubair Nabi
    June 28, 2016

    hi there ….thank you so much for all the explanation….u did it so well…God u should have been a teacher …I have a keen intrest in woodwork n um only a beginner…Will b wachin all Ur videos.

  • Shaun Donovan
    June 28, 2016

    Thanks for the great instructional videos. Your videos are like having a private teacher on hand.

  • rick smith
    June 28, 2016

    nice series, looking forward to more. Good habit you have with the table saw, I always hook the pinky over the fence, keeps the others from getting too close to the blade in fact I hook two fingers on mine and after 20 years of this I still have all my appendages

  • Jason Zvokel
    June 28, 2016

    I've been making the mistake of trying to mill big boards then cutting them down – this episode helps greatly! I'm just getting started in a garage shop (not many power tools yet, but I find I like the solitude hand tools are giving me after a long day). I've gotten good at removing wind and flattening the first side of a board and edge joining, but do you have any tips on getting that 2nd side parallel to the first face? Thanks!

  • Paul Buckel
    June 28, 2016

    Hi John, Thank you for the detailed instruction. I appreciate the why to that goes along with the how to. Can you please tell me why it is a bad idea to use a planer to flatten a board rather than joiner or hand plane on one side? What happens if you keep flipping it until both sides are flat?
    Thank you

  • Buckey Buckmeir
    June 28, 2016

    thank's Mr.Landis these show's are great can't wait to see more!!

  • John Landis
    June 28, 2016

    Russ, No reason to go to the planer next except that if you are using wood that has already been surfaced by your supplier, it can be difficult to keep track of which face has been face jointed. And there are certainly ways of marking the boards. But once you've sent the time to pick up the pencil and make your marks, you may as well have moved on to the next board for face jointing.

  • Russ Black
    June 28, 2016

    Really interested in getting into this field as a hobby, and I appreciate learning anything and everything I can.
    A question however, Is there a reason to plane in between using the jointer twice, or can you make that right angle cut before moving to the planer?

  • Jerry Gioia Sr
    June 28, 2016

    Great Instructions John. Looking forward to seeing more.

  • Bjay Lucero
    June 28, 2016

    Thanks John. Nice vids and informative as well.

  • John Landis
    June 28, 2016

    Ronin. I have been woodworking 20 years and every woodworker I've met who have lost fingers did it on the table saw. I move my hand away "ritualistically " because I wanted to make that the rote movement while I keep my eyes on the blade. 20 years, 4 employees, 50 fingers among us.

  • ronin4711
    June 28, 2016

    Hey John, nice videos, one question though I don't mean to be smart with you, I used table saws probably before your apprenticeship:
    What is that "ritualistic" right hand swing over the top of the table saw to your right ???

  • Jim Spurgeon
    June 28, 2016

    how do you account for snipe when flattening wood in the jointer?

  • softminimal1
    June 28, 2016

    Sound sucks

  • Fletchmeister7
    June 28, 2016

    John would really love to watch some more of your vids, they are really informative and helpful. Do you have a dvd or can you recommend something along the same lines as your lessons.

  • Bestbetbuying
    June 28, 2016

    Great videos, are there any more in the making?

  • Dag log
    June 28, 2016

    The audio is fine for me, I had no problem understanding anything you said.

    I love this series, just wanted to let you know. I have not yet seen the basics of lumber explained so well, even though I've been looking for a while now.

    These videos, as well as those of other YouTube instructors, are a great preparation for me to at some point actually begin to woodwork. It takes a while, because I'm consciously trying to avoid beginner's mistakes.

    It's wonderful that you've decided to share your knowledge in this way.